Air Conflicts: Vietnam New Images Released

By Andrew Ogley, 3 years ago
Not so long ago we were able to bring you the latest trailer for the upcoming aerial combat title, Air Conflicts: Vietnam.

With the launch period approaching, bitComposer Games have released a number of new images of some of the aircraft that will be featured along with some background information about each of the planes. The images also give an impression of what we can expect when we hit the skies.

Press Release 9-9-2013

A-4 Skyhawk’s filled the light-bomber role during the Vietnam War for the U.S. Navy, before being replaced by the A-7 Corsair II. The A-4’s small, delta-wing frame and relatively light weight allowed it to be deployed from the smaller WWII-era aircraft carriers, a feat many of the more modern jet fighters couldn’t do. A-4s had air-to-air fighter capabilities, along with ground- and sea-attack capacities, which made it of use to the U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps.
Press Release 9-9-2013

The A-7 Corsair went into service with the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War to fill in the attack aircraft role. The A-7 also served with the U.S. Air Force, as the replacement for the A-1 Skyraider, F-100 Super Sabre, and the F-105 Thunderchief. During Operation Cornet Dancer (Sept 1972), the A-4 found it was well-suited as the security escort aircraft to SAR (search and rescue) missions, due largely to its tough construction and overall strength.
Press Release 9-9-2013

In service with the U.S. Air Force since 1955, the B-52 Stratofortress was involved in Operation Arc Light, the first combat mission of the Vietnam War. During the war, their bomb payload was increased to facilitate saturation bombing runs. B-52s dropped 15,237 tons of ordnance on military and industrial NVA targets during Operation Linebacker II (18–29 December 1972). B-52 tail-gunners also scored 3 kills during the Vietnam War, helping to solidify the aircraft as one of the iconic combat machines of the war.
Press Release 9-9-2013

During the Vietnam War, the C-123 Provider was the primary aircraft used in Operation Ranch Hand, the U.S. military’s effort to thin out the foilage of the Vietnam countryside through the use of Herbicide Orange (aka Agent Orange) and other defoilants. C-123s were also used extensively as transports (most notably in the Air America program), and by the U.S. Coast Guard for their SAR (search and rescue) missions.
Press Release 9-9-2013

The F-4 Phantom is most noted as being a highly versatile aircraft, used in numerous roles by the U.S. Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps. During the Vietnam War, it served in CAS (close air support), air superiority, and recon roles, performed as a bomber in North Vietnam and Laos, and was instrumental during the latter half of the “wild weasel” SEAD (suppression of enemy air defenses) missions. The Phantom’s versatility designated it as the primary tactical ordnance delivery system for the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War.

While mostly known for its role in the Cuban Missile Crisis, the F-8 Crusader is also known for engaging in the first aerial combat of the Vietnam War, when a sortie met a force of North Vietnamese Air Force MiG-17 Fresco aircraft on 3 April 1965. At the end of the war, the Crusader had the best kill ratio (19:3) amongst all U.S. aircraft deployed in Vietnam.
Press Release 9-9-2013

Designed as a replacement for the F-86 Sabre, the F-100 Super Sabre entered service as a fighter bomber, and made its first mark in history by serving in that role longer than any other aircraft (1961 - 1971) during the Vietnam War. Other historical marks include having a major use of titanium in its structure, being the first U.S. Air Force jet that could reach supersonic speed, and by participating in the first jet dogfight (air-to-air combat) of the Vietnam War.
ACV Images

The F-104 Starfighter only served the U.S. Air Force for 11 years (1958 - 1969). During its short deployment in the Vietnam War, it served in Operation Rolling Thunder, and in air support and air superiority roles, until it was replaced by the F-4 Phantom in 1967. The Starfighter is most noted for its small, sleek airframe, designed to fit into the interceptor role. However, the airframe size, lack of armament space, and a poor safety record kept its overall performance record short.
ACV Images

When the F-105 Thunderchief entered service in 1955, it had a single purpose: to deliver nuclear weapons deep into the Soviet Union. Its large engine and streamlined profile allowed it to be a fast, low-altitude strike bomber, capable of entering and exiting a mission area quickly, while still destroying its intended targets. These capabilities made it perfect for use during the Vietnam War, where its high-speed and low-altitude ability made it an excellent aircraft for hitting NVA targets. The Thunderchief also played crucial roles in Operation Rolling Thunder, and in the initial “wild weasel” SEAD (suppression of enemy air defenses) missions in Vietnam.
ACV Images

The MiG-15 Fagot gained prominence during the Korean War, where it was involved in the first jet vs jet dogfight of the war, and outclassed nearly all other military aircraft in the skies there. However, by the Vietnam War, MiG 15s had been downgraded to mere training status, as America’s air superiority and technology greatly outpaced the rest of the world.
ACV Images

The MiG-17 Fresco made up a large part of North Vietnam's first jet fighter regiment, the 921st. It was designed primarily to be an intercept fighter, with the goal of targeting American bombers during the Vietnam War. It also saw and was successful at its share of dogfighting combat, and even successfully completed a few fighter-bomber missions, a role it wasn’t designed for.
ACV Images

The MiG-19 Farmer began operation during the Vietnam War near the end of Operation Rolling Thunder in 1968, and also saw action in Operation Linebacker I and Operation Linebacker II. It was specifically designed to counter the F-4 Phantom II and the F-105 Thunderchief, and is recorded to have downed 7 F-4s.
ACV Images

Based on the successful designs of Soviet Korean War-era aircraft, the Fishbed was created to be lightweight fighter / interceptor combo, similar to the F-104 Starfighter and F-5 Freedom Fighter. Yet, it differed from those classic designs by having a nose cone air intake and an almost true delta-shaped wing. However, its short range made dogfighting a liability, but excellently suited to ground-controlled interception (GCI) missions. Of the 17 North Vietnamese air combat ace pilots, 13 of them were accomplished with the Fishbed.
Air Conflicts: Vietnam is due to hit stores in Fall of 2013.
Andrew Ogley
Written by Andrew Ogley
Andrew has been writing for TA since 2011 covering news, reviews and the occasional editorials and features. One of the grumpy old men of the team, his mid-life crisis has currently manifested itself in the form of an addiction to sim-racing - not being able to afford the real life car of his dreams. When not spending hours burning simulated rubber, he still likes to run around, shoot stuff and blow things up - in the virtual world only of course.