Goat Simulator: Mmore Goatz Edition Review

By Marc Hollinshead, 1 year ago
When Goat Simulator was released onto consoles earlier this year, it caught a fair bit of attention, both good and bad. While some found it entertaining, others wondered why it even existed. The developers of the game, Coffee Stain Studios, obviously preferred the former and decided to make a new edition of the game for those who couldn't get enough of the goat. Along comes Goat Simulator: Mmore Goatz Edition. This weirdly named title adds new features to what is already an oddity of a game and somehow manages to be even stranger. Does that mean it's worth playing or that it's a load of goat manure? Let's find out.

Two of the freakiest goats I've ever seenTwo of the freakiest goats I've ever seen

In the original Goat Simulator, the premise was to simply run around the maps and cause random havoc with a goat, whether that's headbutting people or getting flung into the sky. In Mmore Goatz the developers decided to give this formula a little more flavour in the form of an MMO style level and the Goat Z mode. The controls are the same, the graphics are the same...heck, even the loading screens and menus are the same, but here we are given a little more direction in how we cause havoc. This means that there are tasks to accomplish, but you are still free to do whatever you wish and run around headbutting people like the last title. The playgrounds for your goat have more personality this time around and there is more variety aesthetically. You'll see a dinosaur having dinner, zombified elephants spraying green gunk out of their trunks and giant spaceships shooting lasers from afar.

The MMO level of the game acts as a parody of typical MMOs. As soon as you begin, you are free to pick any class that you wish. You can be a tank, mage, hunter, rouge (not rogue) and even a microwave. That's right, you can run around as that appliance in which you heat your dinner with a pair of legs. Unfortunately, the microwave runs extremely slowly so it's better to just pick one of the goat classes that run much faster. Each class is given a few different abilities with which to attack things and they can be rather amusing. Whether you're slamming the tank's rear end down onto the ground or shoving a pack of cards into someone's face as the mage, it's entertaining to explore at your leisure with these abilities at your disposal. Fortunately, you are also able to pick any of these classes at any time so there's no worry about making a decision that you're stuck with forever.

This is what the game calls an Old GoatThis is what the game calls an "Old Goat"

As you explore the area, you'll quickly notice all of the tropes of a real MMO being translated into silly Goat Simulator fashion. Quest givers are dotted around and range from fetching an object for them to escorting an unbelievably slow moving person. Unfortunately, the latter type of missions are only likely to be completed by the most patient of people -- most will give up due to the excruciatingly slow speed of the person to be escorted.

Other goats are scattered around the area to act as other players and make the world feel alive with activity. This idea is played upon even further with the chat channel. You'll see remarks about the overpowered microwave, someone asking to buy powerful gear and even a level 70 sheep attacking everyone in the starting area. Eventually, though, you'll begin to ignore all this and just get on with causing destruction and headbutting random people across the map. This is because all of the features are just artificial when you really look at them. You have no health and your level does nothing for you, so it's all just there to add that bit of flavour. Once you've seen everything in the world, the novelty will eventually wear off.

This is about as useful as microwaves get in this gameThis is about as useful as microwaves get in this game

The other mode that is on offer is Goat Z. This sees your goat transformed into an ugly undead husk that can infect whatever it wants with the touch of a button. The aim is to ruin everything and create a zombie apocalypse. Once that happens, you then need to survive as long as you can before your own creation inevitably kills you. You are able to craft weapons and survival items by using various objects that are placed around the map and they can be quite inventive. You are given health here as well as a hunger meter that will deplete over time. Initially it is too easy to get overwhelmed by zombies or not find food in time so that your goat will starve, therefore the mode can be quite frustrating.

Unless you really want to challenge yourself and attempt to survive for your life without any help, you can easily turn on the various mutators in the game. Just like the first game, these enhance your experience and cause your goat to be even more stupid than it already was. Goat Z becomes a cakewalk after turning on the "Casual Goat" and "No Hunger Goat" mutators because you become invincible and can go back to freely headbutting things without fear of death. There are timed survival quests to try but a lot of these are either awkward to figure out or you can't do them in time. These do nothing more than add to your pointless score, so they are a distraction more than a neccessity. Overall, Goat Z is the weaker of the two modes because it feels little more than the original game with zombies dropped into it. Nonetheless it still adds a bit of extra flavour just like the MMO level.

Just turn those mutators on and you'll be fineJust turn those mutators on and you'll be fine

By design, Goat Simulator feels glitchy and rather unpolished. This is both a strength and weakness because of the end results. Mmore Goatz works in exactly the same way so the same results arise. It can be hilarious to watch your goat plummet down to the ground like a ragdoll after being shot into the air by a firework or other object, but it can be very irritating once you get stuck for no reason. There is a respawn option, but this is no help when you're aiming to complete the Whiplash course in Goat Z without falling off. Mmore Goatz isn't a technical marvel by any stretch, but when you take it for what it is, it can be fun for a short while.

The achievements in Mmore Goatz are split between the MMO and Goat Z portions of the game and they are awarded for discovering various things, completing challenges and doing random activites. To everyone's joy, Flappy Goat has vanished, but trying to complete the whiplash course without falling off will be the achievement that infuriates people the most. It is worth noting that, at the time of writing, one of the achievements on the Xbox One version of the game is currently glitched, so it is unobtainable until the developers fix it.

Summary

If you've played the original Goat Simulator, you know exactly what you're in for here. Mmore Goatz doesn't try to be something it's not. From a technical standpoint it can barely stand on its own four hooves but somehow that makes it hilarious to play on occasion. The addition of the MMO level and Goat Z give it more of a personality than its predecessor and it takes more time to do everything that the game has to offer. While the MMO is definitely the better of the two modes, both modes feel different, yet similar enough to work together in the same game. Once you do see everything, though, there isn't much of a reason to stay unless you really enjoy the playground that your goat has. For its price, there's no harm in checking it out if you enjoyed the first game or want to play something that won't challenge your brain much, but once you're done, you're done.
3 / 5
Positives
  • MMO and Goat Z give personality to the game
  • More stupid fun with a goat
Negatives
  • Can get boring after a while
  • Glitchy nature of the game can become irritating
Ethics Statement
The reviewer spent just over seven hours running around as a goat and causing all sorts of mayhem. 27 of the game's 30 achievements were earned along the way. A copy of the game was provided by the developer for the purpose of this review.
Marc Hollinshead
Written by Marc Hollinshead
To summarize Marc in two words, it would be "Christian Gamer." You will usually find him getting stuck into story heavy action-adventure games, RPG's and the odd quirky title when he isn't raving about Dark Souls and Mass Effect. Outside the world of gaming, Marc attends and helps out in his church on a regular basis and has a not-so thrilling job in a supermarket.